Archive for December, 2009

Testing in 2009, a Year in Review

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2009. What an eventful year. Eventful in my personal life as well as in my SQA career. A good, eventful year.

I didn’t blog much in 2009, 17 posts in all, and no topics that were SQA groundbreaking.  Yeah, I’m pretty much ashamed of myself and have watched my blog fall off peoples’ radar.If I were to highlight my favorite post it would be my turn from SQA words to illustrations with Do Loop Until Zero. A hit or a miss, I don’t know; I don’t get comments either way on this blog. But none the less, it’s something I enjoy doing. Hopefully you guys will see more of this “comic”, if all works out well, it will be in the 1st issue of the new and upcoming Software Testing Club magazine.

Though the blog was quiet, my SQA and testing career wasn’t. In the last year I had the ability to start filling a large gap that was present in my testing experience portfolio. Prior to 2009 I had no experience in the Linux world and the technologies that surrounded it. Joining a new group within GoDaddy quickly changed this. In 2009 I did a 180 degree turn from my beloved Windows world and submerged myself in Linux in an effort to test and automate a new, internal product. I was scared to make the jump, mostly because my Windows wisdom would be put to little use, and my lack of Linux knowledge would make me a slower tester and automator. Not so enticing when I really pride myself on speed and efficiency (“Hire me, Hire ME! I’m two testers for the price of one!”). Scared or not it was an awesome opportunity to further my skills, and help a 1.0 product using my experience with agile practices and automation. With the help of an awesome two  man development team, I was able to learn, automate and wade through the following technology highlights in 2009:

Product: A storage system (C, mySQL):

  • I used PuTTY as an SSH client to the dev, test and prod environment running CentOS as a flavor of Linux
  • I extended developer unit tests and automated API functional and boundary testing with Perl unit testing (Test::Unit)
  • I extended PHPUnit to serve as an automation framework for automation of functional tests (use case, boundary, error handling,etc). The framework was named TAEL (Test Automation Ecosystem for Linux).

Product: FTP Server that uses the storage system (Perl, mySQL)

  • I automated use cases, and FTP functions using TAEL. FTP functionality was tested using PHP’s FTP  library. Validation was done through FTP responses, and mySQL queries.
  • I performance tested the FTP server and underlying storage system with Apache JMeter. FTP in JMeter is not very robust, and worse yet forces a connection open, logon and close for every request needed, which is not very realistic. Thankfully it’s open source (Java) so I extended it and tweaked it to fit our needs.

Product: User Management Web Service

  • I automated use cases, boundaries, etc with TAEL. Validation was done by querying mySQL or parsing the Web Service response using XPATH queries.

Tool: User Experience Monitor

  • In an effort to monitor response times on an ongoing basis, I wrote a script that executes basic functionality every 15 minutes, stores the timed results in FTP, where they are picked up and  processed by a chron job that puts the results in a database. Chron takes the results puts them into an XML format which are then viewed in a PHP web page using the chart control XML/SWF charts. We found some very interesting activity and trends through this test/monitor. This turned out to be a very interesting almost real-time QA asset for the team.

Product: REST service

Automation with Ruby: With a department wide goal that everybody must do a little automation, I led them down the path of Ruby/Watir (due to cost, and Ruby being pretty easy to learn). The results are looking pretty good, adoption has gone well and progress is being made. Here are a few details about the framework that I built over a few weekends:

  • Uses a pattern that I call “Test, Navigate, Execute, Assert”
  • Manages tests with the Ruby library: Test::Unit
  • Uses Watir for web page automation
  • Web Service automation is done with:  soap4r  & REXML
  • MySQL database validation with the gem:  dbd-mysql
  • Data driven automation from Excel using Roo

 
Process: Since I’ve been lucky enough to work with a highly motivated, small team of three, our process needs to be and has been really light. We’ve been pretty successful at being extremely agile. For project management we followed a scrum-like process for a little over half a year using the tool Target Process, but then moved to a KanBan approach with our own home-grown tool. Recently we moved from the home-grown tool to a trial with Jira, while trying to maintain the project in KanBan style. I have to  say that I really like KanBan, it works particularly well for our team because it is small. When you’re as small and tight knit as out team is, we always know what each other is working on, so the more light-weight the better. It seems the largest payoff of these types of process and tools for our team is tracking backlog items as well as giving management insight to what we’re up to.

What’s in store for me in 2010? Well, I’ll likely be working on the same products, but as far as major learning and growth opportunity I’m excited to dive into the awesome new features of Visual Studio 2010 for Testers as well as to learn and use some C++. Now, if I can just convince myself to blog about those experiences as I go.



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